How To Build a TimesMachine

necro81 writes: The NY Times has an archive, the TimesMachine, that allows users to find any article from any issue from 1851 to the present day. Most of it is shown in the original typeset context of where an article appeared on a given page — like sifting through a microfiche archive. But when original newspaper scans are 100-MB TIFF files, how can this information be conveyed in an efficient manner to the end user? These are other computational challenges are described in this blog post on how the TimesMachine was realized.

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Cisco Patches Authentication, Denial-of-Service, NTP Flaws In Many Products

itwbennett writes: Cisco Systems has released a new batch of security patches for flaws affecting a wide range of products, including for a critical vulnerability in its RV220W wireless network security firewalls. The RV220W vulnerability stems from insufficient input validation of HTTP requests sent to the firewall’s Web-based management interface. This could allow remote unauthenticated attackers to send HTTP requests with SQL code in their headers that would bypass the authentication on the targeted devices and give attackers administrative privileges.

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After More Than a Decade, MSN Chat Authentication Is Documented

An anonymous reader writes: After MSN Chat closed in 2003, and then again in 2006, some guy has finally documented the authentication system used — over a decade later! Developer Joshua Davison writes by way of explanation:
I think it’s important to document the challenge we (users, scripters, hackers) faced connecting to MSN Chat, which is the only known ‘proper’ implementation of IRCX v8.1 at this time.
MSN Chat introduced a GateKeeper SASL authentication protocol, which implemented ‘GateKeeper’ and ‘GateKeeperPassport’ (not dissimilar to the widely documented NTLM authentication protocol, which was also implemented as NTLM, and NTMLPassport)
The GateKeeper Security Support Provider (GKSSP) functioned in two ways; allowing a user to login with a Microsoft Account (Previously known as Microsoft Passport, .NET Passport, Microsoft Passport Network, and Windows Live ID), and also allowed guest authentication for users without, or not willing to use a Microsoft Account.
While most users didn’t need or want to understand how the protocol worked, there were many of us who did, and many that just preferred to use MSN Chat outside of the browser.

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Dutch Police Train Bald Eagles To Take Out Drones

Qbertino writes: Heise.de (German article) reports that the Dutch police is training raptor birds — bald eagles, too — to take down drones. There’s a video (narrated and interviewed in Dutch) linked in TFA. It’s a test phase and not yet determined if this is going real — concerns about the birds getting injured are among the counter-arguments against this course of action. This all is conducted by a company called “Guard from above,” which designs systems to prevent smugling via drones. The article also mentions MTU’s net-shooting quadcopter concept of a drone-predator. Of course, there are also ‘untrained’ birds taking out quadcopters, as you might have seen already.

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The Feds’ Freeway Font Flip-Flop

McGruber writes: Citylab has the news that the U.S. Federal Highway Administration is revoking its 2004 approval of the “Clearview” font for road signs. Clearview was made to improve upon its predecessor, a 1940s font called Highway Gothic. Certain letters appeared to pose visibility problems, especially those with tight interstices (or internal spacing)—namely lowercase e, a, and s. At night, any of these reflective letters might appear to be a lowercase o in the glare of headlights. By opening up these letterforms, and mixing lowercase and uppercase styles, Clearview aimed to improve how these reflective highway signs read. Now, just 12 years later, the FHWA is reversing itself: “After more than a decade of analysis, we learned—among other things—that Clearview actually compromises the legibility of signs in negative-contrast color orientations, such as those with black letters on white or yellow backgrounds like Speed Limit and Warning signs,” said Doug Hecox, a FHWA spokesperson, in an email. The FHWA has not yet provided any research on Clearview that disproves the early claims about the font’s benefits. But there is at least one factor that clearly distinguishes it from Highway Gothic: cost. Jurisdictions that adopt Clearview must purchase a standard license for type, a one-time charge of between $175 (for one font) and $795 (for the full 13-font typeface family) and up, depending on the number of workstations. That doesn’t seems like a very good use of tax money, for something that can be nondestructively reused once created.

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Jaguar Land Rover To Test Autonomous Cars In ‘Living Lab’

An anonymous reader writes: British automaker Jaguar Land Rover has announced its £5.5 million investment in a ‘living lab’ for the testing and development of connected and self-driving car technologies. The UK Connected Intelligent Transport Environment (CITE) will span 41-miles of public roads around Coventry and Solihull, and will be used to test new connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) systems in real-life conditions. The company is planning to install roadside sensor equipment around the lab route to monitor vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications. The fleet will include 100 CAV cars, which will test four different connectivity technologies; 4G long-term evolution (LTE) and its more advanced version LTE-V, dedicated short-range communication (DSRC), and local Wi-Fi hotspots.

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Google To Take ‘Apple-Like’ Control Over Nexus Phones

Soulskill writes: According to a (paywalled) report in The Information, Google CEO Sundar Pichai wants the company to take greater control over development of their Nexus smartphones. When producing Nexus phones, Google has always partnered with manufacturers, like Samsung, LG, and HTC, who actually built the devices. Rather than creating a true revenue stream, Google’s main goal has been to provide a reference for what Android can be like without interference from carriers and manufacturers. (For example, many users are frustrated by Samsung’s TouchWiz skin, as well as the bloatware resulting from deals with carriers. But now, Google appears to want more control. The report indicates Google wants to do a better job of competing throughout the market. They want to compete with Apple on the high end, but also seem concerned that manufacturers haven’t put enough effort into quality budget phones. The article at Droid-Life argues, “We all know that Nexus phones will never be household items until Google puts some marketing dollars behind them. Will a top-to-bottom approach finally push them to do that?”

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Windows 10 Now a ‘Recommended Update’ For Windows 7 and 8.1 Users

Mark Wilson writes: Microsoft has been accused of pushing Windows 10 rather aggressively, and the company’s latest move is going to do nothing to silence these accusations. For Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users, Windows 10 just became a ‘recommended update’ in Windows Update. This is a change from the previous categorization of the upgrade as an ‘optional update’ and it means that there is renewed potential for unwanted installations. After the launch of Windows 10, there were numerous reports of not only the automatic download of OS installation files, but also unrequested upgrades. The changed status of the update means that, on some machines, the installation of Windows 10 could start automatically.

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Ask Slashdot: How Do I Reduce Information Leakage From My Personal Devices?

Mattcelt writes: I find that using an ad-blocking hosts file has been one of the most effective way to secure my devices against malware for the past few years. But the sheer number of constantly-shifting server DNs to block means I couldn’t possibly manage such a list on my own. And finding out today that Microsoft is, once again, bollocks at privacy (no surprise there) made me think I need to add a new strategic purpose to my hosts solution — specifically, preventing my devices from ‘phoning home’. Knowing that my very Operating Systems are working against me in this regard incenses me, and I want more control over who collects my data and how. Does anyone here know of a place that maintains a list of the servers to block if I don’t want Google/Apple/Microsoft to receive information about my usage and habits? It likely needs to be documented so certain services can be enabled or disabled on an as-needed basis, but as a starting point, I’ll gladly take a raw list for now.

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Fine Brothers File For Trademark On Word “React”

DewDude writes: You’ve probably seen them on YouTube: Fine Brothers are the two behind the video series Teens React, Kids React, and Elders React. Well, the two seem to feel they somehow invented this whole thing and have now filed for a very broad trademark. The USPTO filing says the trademark will be published tomorrow and looking at the filing; it is literally for the word “react” and simply shows a screenshot of their YouTube page. They have also apparently gotten approval for “Parents React,” “Celebrities React,” and “Parents React”; as well as filed applications for things such as “Do They Know It,” “Lyric Breakdown,” “People v. Technology,” and “Try Not To Smile Or Laugh.”

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